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OCTOBER 2003

THE B MOVIE MONTH IN REVIEW

WEAVER'S EYE FOR DETAIL
What better way to commemorate the Halloween season than with film historian Tom Weaver's latest tome? "Eye on Science Fiction: 20 Interviews with Classic SF and Horror Filmmakers," (bound, incidentally in a spectacular cover) is the author's latest treasury made up of encounters with the likes of Herman Cohen, Mike Connors, Alex Gordon, Brett Halsey, David Hedison, Richard Kiel, Ted Post, William Self, William Wellman Jr. and other fright-film veterans who are ever at ease with Weaver, recounting the films and personalities of the past with invaluable candor. (And boy, what a cover!) Nobody, but NOBODY, is better prepared or more astute than Weaver when it comes to interviewing genre-film subjects. (And who else would be dedicated enough to track down Martin Varno? Not familiar with the name? Buy the book!) It's no wonder "Classic Images" calls him "king of the interviewers" with love and genuflection. In short, it's another "must-have" from The Researcher with the Atom Brain. (Did we mention that handsome cover?) You can get yours at:
http://www.mcfarlandpub.com
Or by calling: 1-800-253-2187
Be sure to tell 'em the b Monster sent you!

"FORGOTTEN" 4 FORTHCOMING
Film historian Michael H. Price and his equally obsessed co-author John Wooley are poised to unleash the latest edition in the exhaustive "Forgotten Horrors" series. Anyone familiar with past volumes by Price and the late George Turner know what to expect: No cinema-stone-left-unturned research coupled with cogent critique covering film archania of every stripe. These guys dig deep and come up with film gems I guarantee you've never heard of, but will want to seek out. To crib a bit from Price's intro, "I [developed], early on, an appetite for offbeat forms of literature and entertainment. No affinity is more like it, for even the many specimens that I don't particularly enjoy still exert a certain fascination and command a certain respect, grudging or not." He could be referring to most of the B Monster's favorite films.

This fourth "Forgotten Horrors" volume will address the post-war era, which, according to Price, "saw a gathering surge in science-fictional entertainment." You want obscure? "The Man From Planet X" may be the best-known film in the book. And few can chronicle such rarely trod film turf with the aplomb this pair can muster. "As usual," adds Price, "we've combed the general output of the lower-rent filmmaking companies with some salient exceptions, usually involving Poverty Row alumni, such as Sam Katzman and Dore Schary, who had infiltrated the major studios and come up with the customary playbill of purebred genre items, unclassifiable oddities, and nearer-the-mainstream fare infused with a certain dark peculiarity." Midnight Marquee Press is presently preparing "Forgotten Horrors 4" for publication. Stay tuned.

KERRY'S KID ALIVE AND KICKING
There's a brand new "Monster Kid" in town. That's right, a spiffy new issue of Kerry "Count Gamula" Gammill's endearing online homage to monster mags past is his best effort yet, featuring a lavishly illustrated salute to the monstrously talented illustrator Jack Davis. Everything from gum cards to album covers to that fabulous six-foot Frankenstein poster is showcased in a loving, multi-page tribute. There's also a chat with "Teenage Werewolf" costar Kenny Miller, more of the inspired sketches of Frank Dietz, a new batch of 3-D monster images, mail, reviews, merchandise and one particularly whimsical feature spotlighting the breakfast cereal once hawked by Eddie Munster's TV hero, Zombo (you gotta see it). If you're as yet unfamiliar with the Monster Kid, it's high time you got acquainted.
http://www.monsterkid.com
Tell Count Gamula the B Monster sent you!

WAY TO GO, FREDDY-O
Director Fred Olen Ray is just returned from Estepona, Spain, where he copped the Silver Unicorn for Best Director at the Estepona Fantasy Film Festival for his feature "Stranded," a sci-fi thriller starring Ice T and Michael Dudikoff. "Needless to say," says Fred, "I'm thrilled." Congrats from the B Monster.

MIDMAR'S MODERN MISSION
And speaking of Midnight Marquee Press, we're informed that Gary and Sue Svehla will be inaugurating a new magazine geared toward contemporary horror films, with a special emphasis on their leading ladies. "We hope to debut the mag in January 2004," say the Svehlas. "MidMar will have representatives at the Monster Mania and Chiller [conventions] to promote the new mag." The publishers are still casting about for a name for the new publication, and invite readers to submit suggestions. They're also soliciting reader's lists of their five favorite modern horror actresses. You can submit your suggestions at:
http://www.midmar.com
Let 'em know the B Monster sent you!

CHAN BAN LIFTED WITH A QUALIFICATION
Fox Movie Channel decided after all to air a handful of their restored Charlie Chan pictures. FMC had restored many of the classic Chans and had planned a summer-long film festival. This news was greeted by howls of protest from civil rights activists decrying the vintage films' depiction of Asian-Americans. This, in turn, incensed fans of the Chan films who organized a write-in campaign to have the festival reinstated. As their licensing agreement to air the films was about to expire in September, Fox decided to show four of the classic Chans -- "Murder Over New York," "Charlie Chan at the Opera," "Castle in the Desert" and "Charlie Chan in Honolulu" -- accompanied by before-and-after panel discussions featuring Asian-American studies Professor Peter Feng and actor Harry Shen, with actor George Takei of "Star Trek" fame acting as moderator. Karen Narasaki, president and executive director of the National Asian Pacific American Legal Consortium told The Hollywood Reporter, "We believe that the introductory piece and follow-up discussion will help promote understanding of the issues many Asian-Americans have with these films."

FAIRNESS GOVERNS AT SCI FI
Owing to equal time considerations, the Sci Fi Channel yanked three Arnold Schwarzenegger movies that were originally scheduled to run prior to California's gubernatorial recall election. According to an official statement, although they're "not obligated under federal rules to give equal time to political candidates, Sci Fi Channel has made a decision to re-schedule all Arnold Schwarzenegger movies until after the California ballot on Oct. 7." If it's equal time they're worried about, how about running an Arnold film preceded by an episode or two of "Different Strokes?" And what about that porno actress who's on the ballot? Let's give her some air. This is America, dammit!

NO LULLS IN THIS PALOOZA
What's the latest word from Thrillville? Life-lovin' lounge lizard Will "The Thrill" Viharo, who hosts B-movie screenings at Oakland's fabulous Parkway Theater, will be presenting the "Horror Host-Palooza." These spook show spectaculars commence October 9 when Berkeley, California's Doktor Goulfinger and Sacramento's Mr. Lobo host a screening of director Lucio Fulci's 1979 Euro-gross-out "Zombie." Also on the bill are the "lost classic," "Voodoo Black Exorcist," a zombie fashion show, monster-maker Chuck Jarman, vintage trailers and more.

The Palooza continues October 23, when Goulfinger, Lobo and The Thrill entourage are joined by legendary West Coast "Creature Features" host John Stanley for a showing of the 2002 feature "Godzilla-Mothra-King Ghidorah: Giant Monsters All-Out Attack." There'll be live theremin accompaniment by Robert Silverman and insights from Japanese monster authorities Bob Johnson and August Ranone. Admission to each show is $8.00. To learn more abut the thrills to be had, check out: http://www.thrillville.net/calendar/index.html
For info on the theater itself, visit:
http://www.picturepubpizza.com
Tell 'em, of course, the b Monster sent you!

HALLOWEEN IN WASTELAND
You can kick off your Halloween season with a trip to the Cinema Wasteland Movie and Memorabilia Show in Strongsville, Ohio, mere minutes from downtown Cleveland. There's the usual, memorabilia-packed giant dealer's room, near 'round-the-clock movie screenings and a guest list highlighted by yet another "Evil Dead" reunion spotlighting stars Betsy Baker, Hal Delrich, Ellen Sandweiss and Theresa Tilly aka Sarah York, as well as the film's makeup and effects man Tom Sullivan. The con also features something of a "Night of the Living Dead" reunion, as well, featuring Executive Producer Russ Streiner, screenwriter John Russo, and zombies Kyra Schon and Bill Hinzman.

Other featured guests include:

Kenny Miller, 1950s teen star of "Teenage Werewolf" and "Puppet People" fame
Anthony DiLeo of "Day of the Dead"
Basil Gogos, master monster portraitist
Coralina Cataldi-Tassoni, Euro-horror star

You'll also want to avail yourself of Cinema WastelandÕs "TV Horror Host Invasion." That's right, movie hosts from every corner of the contiguous states will descend upon the convention hall. The roster includes:

A. Ghastlee Ghoul - Dayton, Ohio
Baron Mondo Von Doren - Pensacola, Florida
Baron Von Wolfstein - Dayton, Ohio
The Bone Jangler - Aurora, Illinois
Count Gore DeVol - Washington, D.C.
Dr. Creep - Billed as the "grandaddy" of Southwestern Ohio horror hosts.
Dr. Freak - The Horror Hosts' "designated driver" (whatever that means)
Doktor Goulfinger - Berkeley, Calif.
Dr. Mor B.S. - Fort Wayne, Ind.
Dr. Sarcofiguy - Northern Virginia
Dr. Shock - Southwestern Michigan
The Ghoul - Detroit, Mich., Cleveland, Ohio
Halloween Jack - Jackson, N.J.
I. Zombie - Lexington, Ky.
The Mortician - Brunswick, Ohio
Professor Anton Griffin - Austin, Texas
Remo D. - Monterey, Calif.
Son of Ghoul - Cleveland
Suspira - The future Mrs. A. Ghastlee Ghoul

It all gets started October 3. For more info, check out:
http://www.cinemawasteland.com/show.html
You know by now to tell 'em the b Monster sent you!

TENNESSEE TOYS WITH GENRE FANS
Well, you can't be in two places at once, so you'll have to make an informed decision; "Adventure Con 2.5," promoted as "Tennessee's largest toy show," also begins October 3. The con takes place at the Gatlinburg Convention Center, in beautiful Gatlinburg, Tenn. According to promoters, "In just a few years this event has become one of the largest collectible toy shows in the Southeast." Naturally, there's a celeb guest list, and this abbreviated but impressive lineup features personalities with decidedly diverse credentials:

George Lazenby, one-time James Bond
Yvonne Craig, Batgirl herself
Dawn Welles of "Gilligan's Island" fame
Danielle Harris of "Halloweens" 4 and 5
Jeremy Bulloch, "Star Wars'" notorious Boba Fett

You can find out more at:
http://www.adventurecon.com
As always, be sure and tell 'em the B Monster sent you!

FANTICON'S OPEN GATE OVERATURE
Okay, so don't blow all of your money on opening weekend. There's still FantiCon 2003 in Wilmington, N.C. The show will be held October 10-12 at the National Guard Armory adjacent to Wilmington's Legion Stadium. FantiCon offers everything you'd expect from a genre-themed con, along with an eclectic and attractive guest roster that includes:

Peter Jurasik of "Babylon 5"
Pat Hingle, veteran character actor and Commissioner Gordon of the "Batman" franchise
Henry Darrow of "Star Trek: The Next Generation"
Frank Capra Jr., producer, director and Screen Gems president (Sunday Only)

Perhaps the best reason to attend, however, is the fact that a portion of FantiCon's proceeds will go toward ending domestic violence. "We here at FantiCon are very happy to be able to step up and help bring domestic violence to an end," say promoters. "Rather than listen to us talk about these issues, please stop by our local shelter's Web site." This resource is called Open Gate, and the B Monster salutes the convention's concern. You can find out more at:
http://www.fanticon.org
Or, visit the Open Gate site at:
http://www.domesticviolence-wilm.org
You know the routine: Tell 'em the B Monster sent you!

LAST CALL FOR CHILLER
And finally, one more plug for Kevin Clement's amazing colossal Chiller Theatre con, which usually boasts the most impressive guest list of any genre-film show. For example:

Julie Adams ("Creature From the Black Lagoon")
Linda Blair ("The Exorcist")
Bob Burns (Mythic memorabilia collector)
Ben Chapman ("Creature From the Black Lagoon")
Gary Clarke ("How to Make a Monster")
Sid Haig ("Spider Baby")
Clint Howard (Brother of Ron and star in his own right)
Sara Karloff (daughter of Boris)
Noel Neill (TV's Lois Lane)
Ingrid Pitt ("Countess Dracula")
Zacherley (of course)
And more.

It happens Halloween at the Sheraton Meadowlands in lovely East Rutherford, N.J. For more details, visit:
http://www.chillertheatre.com
By all means, tell 'em the B Monster sent you!

THE FUTURE LOOKS SUB-ROSY
The folks at Sub Rosa Studios, producers and distributors of myriad independent cult and horror films, have announced a new partnership called The New Global Independent Media Force. No, they're not a muti-tentacled, tri-lateralist conglomeration. The partners in this new independent distribution enterprise are Film Threat DVD, Vista Street Entertainment, Key East Entertainment, Global Communications, RGB World and Cullen Studios. According to Sub Rosa honcho Ron Bonk, "These companies bring something unique to our growing list of product. They offer a great mix of genres, showing the true versatility and commercial viability of today's independent DVD releases." Among the titles in the current Sub Rosa catalog are "Gut Pile," "Vicious Sweet," "Dark Descent," "City of the Vampires, Necrosluts" and "I Spit On Your Corpse, I Piss On Your Grave." Something tells me they won't be targeting the Disney demographic.

NEW ON DVD

BEAST FROM 20,000 FATHOMS
If it ain't the best doggone dinosaur picture, it's in the top five. Based on a story by Ray Bradbury, animated by Ray Harryhausen and directed by Eugene Lourie, "Beast From 20,000 Fathoms" is one of the handful of horrors that even uninitiated mainstreamers will admit is one nifty picture. By now, the premise is time-honored; atomic testing cracks the Arctic ice and sets free a long-dormant rhedosaurus that eventually makes applesauce of the Big Apple. The big beast covers now-familiar turf, but in 1953 it was rarely done, and since then it has rarely been done better. Lourie later directed "The Colossus of New York," and, more significantly, "The Giant Behemoth" and "Gorgo." All are interesting variations on a theme. They vary, likewise, in quality, with "Beast" head and shoulders above the subsequent films. I don't know why Lourie was fascinated with dinosaurs, but I'm glad he was. (Lourie was primarily an art director/designer, with credits ranging from Renoir's "Grand Illusion" to Sam Fuller's "The Naked Kiss" to Clint Eastwood's "Bronco Billy," his final film credit.)

Paul Christian (aka Paul Hubschmid), as Professor Tom Nesbitt, is supported by a peerless cast of B-film personalities: Kenneth Tobey, Paula Raymond, Cecil Kellaway, Donald Woods, Steve Brodie, Ross Elliott, Jack Pennick, Frank Ferguson Š the list goes on and on. Standing out in a small but pivotal part is sneering Lee Van Cleef as the Army marksman brought in to dispatch the marauding reptile. The film's fiery finale, with the Beast entangled in a Coney Island roller coaster (soldiers, dinosaurs, roller coasters!) is the stuff of many a young boy's dreams. This young boy, anyway.

THE OMEN LEGACY
There is a devoted cadre of fans who think "The Omen" is the best "devil" movie. (And yes, that is a bona fide sub-sub-genre.) The B Monster prefers "Curse of the Demon," or, if you want to bring things more up to date, "The Exorcist." But "The Omen's" adherents see its spooky combination of "Village of the Damned" ("evil children," yet another sub-sub-genre) and "Rosemary's Baby" (devil child, human parents) as groundbreaking. Apparently, they aren't alone, as Hollywood continues to grind out derivations. The turn of the century saw a spate of these, for some reason. Devilish mayhem, the movies foretold, would accompany the new millennium. Evidently, the only scripture that film-types have ever read is the Book of Revelations, I guess because it has the most monsters in it.

In any event, many think of "The Omen" as the pre-eminent Satan film. I think of it as the film that popularized those ubiquitous Gregorian monks chanting away on the soundtrack during suspenseful sequences. It seemed like every suspense-movie trailer of the '80 and '90s had those same monks singing in echo-laden Latin. (The monks have since retired, living off their royalties at a villa in France.) To be fair, parts of "The Omen" are scary (any scene with a Rottweiler in it, for example), but the kid, the center of the film, is not scary. I don't for a minute believe he's got the devil inside him. Also, the film has dated badly, owing to camera gimmickry and that dad-blamed soundtrack. "The Exorcist" is still pretty scary, even after 30 years of "seen-it-all," gross-out cinema. It could be taking place today, in the '70s, in the Ō40s. "The Omen," on the other hand, looks VERY " '70s." (I guess "Frankenstein" looks very '30s, but I'll take the '30s over the '70s every time. But, hey, I'm getting off the point.) Curiously, both films have equally strong casts Š except for that kid. (Gregory Peck and Lee Remick were almost ALWAYS good.)

Another thing both films have in common -- multiple sequels which ALL stank. The DVD release comes with a bonus, "feature-length" documentary about the curse of "The Omen," the strange and terrible things that befell cast and crewmembers, "the resurgent interest in the Book of Revelation and the occult," blah, blah, blah. I don't even want to get into it.

THE OMEGA MAN
Most of the world knows Charlton Heston as Moses or Ben-Hur. To cult movie fans he'll always be the "Omega Man." His earlier roles in the DeMille and Wyler spectacles made him one of the biggest stars on the planet, but I'm willing to bet that the fans who loved "Planet of the Apes," "Soylent Green" and "The Omega Man" will prove more loyal. Sure, they'll continue to screen "The Ten Commandments" on TV every Easter, but a devoted cadre will be scrutinizing and analyzing "The Omega Man" in chat rooms and convention centers with defensive zeal for years to come. That having been said, it's an overrated film. And THAT having been said, its influence resounds throughout contemporary pop-culture, in everything from "Blade" to "Angel" to "Underworld." In ramping up the violence and action quotient of Richard Matheson's story, "I Am Legend," the film added many new clichŽs to the horror lexicon that are emulated 30 years after its release. The story was previously filmed in 1964 as "The Last Man On Earth," a dusty looking, low-budget affair directed by Sidney Salkow -- not without its effective moments -- with a grand performance by Vincent Price, standing out in an otherwise Italian cast. All in all, a decent, gritty, downer of a film.

The 1971 remake was produced by Walter Seltzer (later to produce "Soylent Green") and directed by TV veteran Boris Segal. Screenwriters John and Joyce Corrington amplified the violence of Matheson's source novel, and the resulting film depicts a brutal battle between science and technology represented by Heston's character, the sole survivor of a devastating plague, and regressive primitivism, represented by a "family" of deformed, light-sensitive killers who blame Heston and his ilk for the plague that left them in this condition. Instead of carrying cumbersome wooden stakes with which to dispatch his pursuers, Heston cruises the streets in souped-up cars, mowing down the mutants with all manner of modern weaponry. The action is accompanied by an Isaac Hayes-style score that might have been lifted from any number of "blaxploitation" pictures. The acting is broad, the dialogue is corny, but the film is, nonetheless, fitfully entertaining, and might prove edifying for a generation raised to believe that Wesley Snipes was the movies' first vampire hunter.

IDENTITY
It's difficult to review this film without giving too much away. It can be safely described as the story of a diverse group of people -- a family of three, a pair of newlywed teens, a movie star, her limo driver, a hooker, a cop transporting a killer -- stranded by a heavy storm at a remote, rundown desert hotel. Though complete strangers to one another, during the course of the film they discover that they have one terrifying thing in common. Beyond that, I'm not going to spoil it any more than the trailers already have. Based on this sketch of a premise, I thought for sure I would be able to predict every plot twist and character foible. I was wrong. The script, by Michael Cooney, is cleverly constructed and conveyed with great economy by director James Mangold, an underrated craftsman who made "Cop Land" and the more celebrated "Girl, Interrupted." And the "Identity" ensemble cast is top-flight; John Cusack, Ray Liotta, Amanda Peet, John C. McGinley, with Pruitt Taylor Vince a particular standout. While it isn't exactly a horror movie (we're reluctant to employ the WAY overused term "psychological thriller"), the horrific elements, featuring spectacular prosthetics by Greg Nicotero and his K.N.B. effects shop, are potent. "Identity" should satisfy the most demanding horror fans while rewarding those desperate for this genre to demonstrate a little originality and innovation.

SANTO VS. THE DIABOLICAL AXE
SANTO AND THE WITCH'S ATTACK
SANTO IN THE VENGEANCE OF THE CRYING WOMAN
Peerless film scribe Tom Weaver weighs in with reviews of three new DVD titles starring everyone's favorite wrestler from south of the border, Santo:

Who among us has never stopped to ask themselves what they would do if they ever saw a ghost? One course of action that may not occur to the average Joe is to give the ghost several body slams, followed by a series of closed-fist shots to the mouth. But this of course is the first thing that Santo, the silver-masked lucha libre champion, does when a phantom appears in his wrestling ring toting "The Diabolical Axe" -- the title of one of three new-to-DVD Santo adventures from our amigos at Rise Above.

"Santo vs. the Diabolical Axe" (1964) may be slightly subpar Santo material but it's historically important (if we're permitted to greatly stretch the meaning of the words) in that it reveals the origin of everyone's favorite Mexican silver-masked ring grappler-monster demolisher. In a series of lengthy flashbacks, we learn that the first Santo was a swashbuckler from the 17th-century days of cloaks, swords and mysteriously hiding your face from the camera. A feud with a romantic rival (Fernando Oses, similarly camera-shy) culminates in Oses' conversion to the forces of evil and his abduction of the senorita in question (Lorena Velasquez); Santo subsequently visits the cave of a white-bearded hermit-wizard seeking advice. The wizard tells Santo that the girlfriend is dead and then, Shazam-like, gives him super powers, a wrestling outfit and an open-ended crime-fighting mission that will be passed down, along with powers and costume, to his descendants. The black-hooded Oses shows up again centuries later, regularly popping up out of thin air in front of the 20th-century Santo, executioner's axe raised. Strangely, the element of surprise (and the weapon) aren't enough of an edge when you're battling an hombre with Santo's lightning reflexes.

Truth be told, the movie doesn't have much going for it outside of the novelty of the flashback origin scenes, just a succession of in-and-out-of-the-ring brawls and a record-setting amount of walking around. Another early series entry, "Santo and the Witch's Attack," also 1964, also black and white like "Diabolical Axe," is a good bit better, plot-wise, a macabre semi-mystery about a coven of alluring witches (looking like mythological handmaidens in their fetching short skirts) setting their Satan-worshipping sights on a hapless heiress (Maria Eugenia San Martin). Weirdly, just as you begin to wonder if the moviemakers may have seen and drawn a bit of inspiration from "Horror Hotel," there's stock footage from "Horror Hotel," which sorta clinches it. There's a bloody, ECW-style wrestling match that's among the best in the series, and a hilarious scene where, out of the blue, and for no reason, one of the witches tells the others, within earshot of their prisoner Santo, to remember that they're vulnerable to fire -- prompting Santo to hustle out of the room and then immediately return with blazing torches!

Last and perhaps loopiest of the new bunch is the color (1974), semi-comedic "Santo in the Vengeance of the Crying Woman," in which, unaccountably, Santo refuses to believe in the existence of ghosts -- even though this is the jillionth entry in a series where he does nothing BUT fight monsters, demons and ghosts! Then again, early on in the picture he also grimly says that he refuses to open a grave (he won't desecrate the dead) -- but then later, when he and his boxer-sidekick Mantequilla DO look inside a coffin, Santo briefly juggles the skull of the occupant and then comically tosses it across the tomb! The monster in this one is a withered ghoul, the Crying Woman, who's actually rather creepy. Of course, Santo and Mantequilla can't duke it out with a crumbling female corpse, so for action purposes there's a subplot about a gang of crooks in search of her treasure. "Crying Woman" includes some of the best fights of the series, but also features both villains AND heroes at their stupidest. The crooks use a gun to bump off an old man but never remember to arm themselves prior to confrontations with Santo and Mantequilla. Our heroes, refusing to be outdone in the Stupid Dept., stage an impromptu wrestling match on the lawn of the house of kids they've sworn to protect from the witch -- and get into it so deeply that they don't notice that the yard has filled with fog and the witch has lured one of the kids away!
For more more information, check out:
http://www.riseaboveentertainment.com
You know to tell 'em who sent you.

SPECIAL THANKS TO:

Michael F. Blake, whose books are available through Vestal Press or at http://www.amazon.com

ClassicSciFi.com http://www.classicscifi.com

Harris Lentz III, whose books are available at http://www.mcfarlandpub.com

Bob Madison, founder and CEO of Dinoship, Inc. http://www.dinoship.com

Bryan Senn, whose books are available at http://www.mcfarlandpub.com and at http://www.midmar.com/books.html

Tom Weaver, whose books are available at http://www.mcfarlandpub.com and at http://www.midmar.com/books.html

PARTING BLURB

"The management reserves the right to put up the lights any time the audience becomes too emotionally disturbed!" -- The Black Scorpion



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